Six Pack Accelerator Pump Nozzle Change

It is not recommended to change the accelerator pump nozzle on a choked carb without removing it from the car, but if you are very very careful, you can see what I did.

Please read entire article before considering attempting this operation.

 

Problem: How can you safely change an accelerator pump nozzle with a choke plate in the way… answer, you have to be extremely careful. It can be done but the no one is going to recommend you do it without taking the carb off the car. This is how I did it (see next photos). Gently feel the torque on the screw before removing for your "feel" reference.

Problem: How can you safely change an accelerator pump nozzle with a choke plate in the way… answer, you have to be extremely careful. It can be done but no one is going to officially recommend you do it without taking the carb off the car. This is how I did it (see next photos). Gently feel the torque on the screw before removing for your “feel” reference. In this photo, I’ve already loosened the retaining screw and am ready to pull the assembly out with a needle nose pliers.

 

In order to stabilize the choke plate, use a device like this screwdriver, to hold the choke open the max amount. It frees up your hands and allows you to concentrate completely on the removal and replacement of the nozzle.

In order to stabilize the choke plate, use a device like this screwdriver, to hold the choke open the max amount. It frees up your hands and allows you to concentrate completely on the removal and replacement of the nozzle.

 

I loosened the retaining screw and used a needle nose pliers to very carefully pull the assembly out. I was worried about two things: 1. dropping the nozzle; 2) losing the flat gasket you see still laying in the proper position on the carb. I decided not to move that as I considered it too risky. The carb is almost new, so I presumed the gasket is still in okay shape to seal.

I loosened the retaining screw and used a needle nose pliers to very carefully pull the assembly (nozzle and screw) out. I was worried about two things: 1. dropping the nozzle; 2) losing the flat gasket you see still laying in the proper position on the carb. I decided not to move that as I considered it too risky. The carb is almost new, so I presumed the gasket is still in okay shape to seal.

 

Here's a shot at the two nozzles. Left is a #31 and the right is a #35, two sizes larger. Bottom view.

Here’s a shot at the two nozzles. Left is a #31 and the right is a #35, two sizes larger. Bottom view.

 

Here's a top view. and the new top washer/seal that I chose to replace since the is little or no risk in replacing that one. I've read somewhere on the Net that you don;t need to go larger than a #35 on the street. I've also heard from Julius Steuer that he usually goes two sizes up. Which would be a #35.

Here’s a top view. and the new top washer/seal that I chose to replace since the is little or no risk in replacing that one. I’ve read somewhere on the Net that you don’t need to go larger than a #35 on the street. I’ve also heard from Julius Steuer that he usually goes two sizes up. Which would be a #35.

 

noz_6

 

I'm taking this picture with my free hand so it's not in focus. This action you need to be rid of all distractions, you do not want to drop tis sucker into your carb throat. You need to guide this into the open hole like your life (in the near term) depends on it!

I’m taking this picture with my free hand so it’s not in focus. This action you need to be rid of all distractions, you do not want to drop this sucker into your carb throat. You need to guide this into the open hole like your life (in the near term) depends on it!

 

Ahhh… made it. Carefulyl and gently tightened the screw to slightly tighter than I felt before and pulled the screwdriver out to see the choke plate in its non-op position.

Ahhh… made it. You do need to carefully maneuver the assembly into place as it didn’t just go straight in. You have to work around the curved part of the carb vent due to the limited space….  Carefully and gently tightened the screw to slightly tighter than I felt before and pulled the screwdriver out to see the choke plate in its non-op position.

 

Done. The test drive that day revealed NO popping out the carb. I thought I had fixed the problem. But as I push the engine harder, like I did the following weekend. It still backfires through the carb under harder acceleration. When this thing stops popping, it is going to accelerate like mad money.  Notice the 340 decal - this air cleaner assembly was from my Challenger T/A when I first bought it. It was the wrong assembly for a small block, but correct for a big block. I sold the T/A a few years ago, it was completely restored with the correct small block T/A air cleaner. I may keep this decal on just as a remembrance of the old car and to mess with people's minds.

Done. The test drive that day revealed NO popping out the carb. I thought I had fixed the problem. But as I push the engine harder, like I did the following weekend. It still backfires through the carb under harder acceleration. When this thing stops popping, it is going to accelerate like mad money. Notice the 340 decal – this air cleaner assembly was from my Challenger T/A when I first bought it. It was the wrong assembly for a small block, but correct for a big block. I sold the T/A a few years ago, it was completely restored with the correct small block T/A air cleaner. I may keep this decal on just as a remembrance of the old car and to mess with people’s minds.

 

 

 

BONUS VIDEO

Vid_noz

 

 

 

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The Dodge Kid in his youth about 1976. I think I wore this hat everyday through my Freshman year in high school. Photo by Nick Yee

The Dodge Kid in his youth about 1976.

 

Copyright © 2014 ChallenYee.com. TheDodgeKid.com  All Rights Reserved.

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440 Six Pack: Changing Secondary Springs

Changing Secondary Springs plus bonus VIDEO at bottom of post to visit a popular local tourist attraction!

FIRST THINGS FIRST:  If you were considering buying a Holley Quick Change Kit for your secondary springs on your Six Pack setup, based on my experience, do not do it for two good reasons:

1) Save your money, it won’t fit (as the photos below will indicate)
2) It’s easy to change springs without any quick change kit

springs_kit_nofit

The Vacuum housings on the Holley 4365 are larger than the usual Holley Secondary housings that the Quick Change Kits are designed for. I asked a Holley tech if it would work before I bought it, but unfortunately, he was wrong. Anyone want to buy two kits? LOL

 

I decided to change to the Purple springs, which was recommended by Julius Steuer in Chatsworth, CA and although I’ve also seen a suggestion of using the Black Springs in an internet article, I decided to go with what Julius recommended. It seems like, every time I use a part that’s different than what he recommends, I lose money.

spring_colors

Hey, Purple is a cool color. As you can tell by looking at the pointy ends of the springs. Fortunately no one recommended Yellow Springs, because it seems like there are two springs that come in the kit that have Yellow ends. Basically, the heavy E-body needs the secondaries to open more slowly so, Purple and I believe , Black will both do this. If the car was lighter or stiffer (more racing type) gearing, the secondaries will do better opening earlier.

 

USING YOUR PHILIPS HEAD SCREWDRIVER

Anyway, for a novice or someone who hasn’t touched a screw driver on an engine part in awhile, first use the correct sized phillips head so you do not damage your parts and you get a correct feel for torque. I suggest to gently check the torque on the screws before you remove them. I used that feel as a reference. Interesting to note, however, when I reinstalled them I felt the torque needed to be very slightly tighter (if anyone wants to argue that point , please do). I think you’re supposed to trust that the lock washer puts enough tension to hold the screw even though it feels slightly loose. I guess I don’t fully trust lock washers (LOL).

 

All the screws on your Holley for this job will have lock washers and I usually use a two-finger and one thumb tightness. Don’t gorilla tighten these parts otherwise you might end up with a leaky diaphragm or a broken housing.

Also try using a star torque pattern when tightening to evenly distribute the tension on the rubber edge which should line up on the holes without binding on the screws.

Make sure when installing your new spring, the pointy end snaps fully into place, on the circular seat on your metal cover. I did this by using my finger to press down through the open end of coils of the spring without compressing it (to avoid damaging the spring). Imagine sticking your index finger down through the picture below and tagging the small end like hitting a bullseye without doing something stupid to your spring.

spring_set_in_place

Also when putting the cover and spring back on, make sure the big point of the spring is seated on the metal disc (see below) and not on the rubber part of the diaphragm, otherwise it will damage and not work right.

spring_oncarb_install

You don’t have to remove the whole housing, but I did, just to make sure that the air passage is free by gently depressing the vacuum rod and feeling the air on your cheek (see photo). AND if you do take off the housing, make sure the little cork gasket is okay where the air passage mates to the carb body.

spring_cheek

 

REMOVING AND INSTALLING the SPRING CLIP (see below). The easy way to remove the spring clips on the rod is just use a tiny screw driver to lever pull them off the round shaft by sticking the tip of the screwdriver into the gap in the clip and then expanding the gap until the clip can be removed with your fingers.

To reinstall those clips,  just use your fingers to snap them back into place making sure it is riding in the groove of the shaft.

springs_clip_removal

The other reason you might remove the housing is that reinstalling the spring cover is a little easier if you don’t have to lean over your fender to do it. There are four screws that attach the vacuum housing to the carb body, there are a short pair and a longer pair. If you take a close look at your housing, you can tell which ones go where.

 

spring_corkseal

 

DRIVING IMPRESSION

Driving the Challenger, I experienced a smoother power band and that’s what I was looking for. I am unlikely to mess with it again unless I get it on a dyno. I still want to change the stock primary #62 jets to #66. I’m pretty sure that will make a positive difference and I want to find out if that will affect how hot my engine runs, but I should get a laser thermometer to check the temps for sure.

My engine is still popping as various speeds at the beginning of punching the gas peddle so I’ll address that on the next article.
I had adjusted the timing last month at 36 deg BTDC at 1500 RPM (based on Hemi George’s suggestion with my Mopar performance distributor) and I thought I fixed that, but still had some pop at low speeds, but now I get pops at low and highway speeds. I did check that the distributor clamp was tight.  I’ll cover this popping problem on the  next post… whenever I get to it.

 

spring_carbs

See ya’all!  You know, I am so busy I hardly have time to make these posts, but I just cram it into my schedule as I have time.

 

 

But hey!… I have got a

BONUS VIDEO for you, The DodgeKid goes to FACEBOOK... CLICK ON PHOTO TO GO TO VIDEO

 

 

FBSite

Sorry to disappoint you but I did not spin a few donuts or wet down the parking lot with bleach for any wild burnouts.
Wouldn’t want anyone to get their hoody wadded up. I do love how George Bush calls it Facebooks.

When I left driving my Challenger, I did feel like somehow I was masquerading as one of the lucky gurus who made a killing on Facebook stock.

 

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The Dodge Kid in his youth about 1976. I think I wore this hat everyday through my Freshman year in high school. Photo by Nick Yee

The Dodge Kid in his youth about 1976.

 

Copyright © 2014 ChallenYee.com. TheDodgeKid.com  All Rights Reserved.

MoPar Alley Rally 2014

Mopar Alley Rally 2014- De Anza College, Cupertino, California

As the largest one-day MoPar car show in California, with over 350 cars annually, this year Mopar Alley found a new venue for their car show at De Anza College. The newly renovated parking lot comes equipped with solar panels overhead which saved most of us from getting toasted by the sun.

Below I’m sharing some of my photos for your curiosity. I also have the text that was posted in front of my car for passerbys. One guy who was looking for a 1970 Challenger for a project car asked if he could sit in my car (as per my invitation below) and, being a minor ambassador for the MoPar world, I was happy to let him.

I’ve entered this car show at least 4 times. I haven’t won anything yet, but I’m okay with it. Being a popular vote, there’s more fun involved. The best part of being at these MoPar shows is talking with people interested in sharing stories and information, taking pictures, and, for me,  catching up with some reading.

This year I entered my R/T in the “Daily Driver 1968-1974” class with 7 other cars. I don’t consider my car “Stock” and I don’t consider it in a show quality “E-body” category, or a “Pro-Street” class. Maybe  a “Vanishing Point” category would work?

In the past I entered my restored  FE5 (Bright Red) T/A, and the competition in that category is really tight.  A very nice, crowd favorite EB5 blue on blue 4 speed T/A owned by Barry Bentley takes the category almost annually and if they didn’t force category 1st place winners to compete in the following year’s “Topgun” class, someone like Barry could possibly take the 1st place category every year in his car’s class. This year there was only one other T/A, a very nice Fe-5 with a black vinyl top, owned by David Gibbons,  in T/A class (see in photos)… ding! winner!

(I did manage to take 3rd place in the Concourse d’Elegance at Stanford University back in 2004 which is judged strictly by officials).

 

mycar

Hi there… I am a real 1970 Dodge Challenger R/T.

I am a 44 year old muscle car and a driver. It’s okay to touch me or ask my owner questions if you want to.

I am known as an “N-code” E-body which means I was originally built with a 383. Actually, I originally came with an automatic and was painted Sublime-Green with a black bumblebee stripe.

At some point at least 3 owners before my current owner, my engine was replaced with a 440, with, I think, a .480 cam, headers and a Richmond 5-speed with 4.56 or stiffer gears. I was driven pretty hard since the 5th gear is 1:1.

Two owners ago, the rear axle gears were changed to 2.94’s which go well with the Richmond 5-speed since 5th gear is 1:1. Highway driving is decent.

Recently I’ve had my suspension upgraded and my 44 year old frame stiffened a little to handle the 440 and had a Six Pack added to match the hood emblems.

If you noticed, the Six Pack Air cleaner decal says “340” not “440”, this is because this air cleaner assembly is from my owner’s Challenger T/A (which he has since had to sell). When he bought that Challenger, it came with the wrong air cleaner assembly but had the correct 340 decal. During the restoration of that car, my owner kept that air cleaner assembly for me, a big-block MoPar. He’s got a new decal but hasn’t gotten around to fixing it yet. So for now, it’s a memorial to the old car (which was sold to a guy in Kentucky).

I still need my carbs tuned to get all my power back and by next year, I hope to get rid of this dorky-looking upholstery and headliner for a new set of Legendary NOS style upholstery and seat buns.

Since my owner likes the 1971 film “Vanishing Point”, I am probably going to remain Alpine White.

Thanks for Looking!

.

between

woodywoody_hood

whatsat?vipers

swingersteve_demon

plumcrazychallengerorange_dart

oldchargerfastbackold2old1old_trucknew_tahood new_orange mycar ltBlu_cuda lime_cuda hoodornament gtx grey69greenSbird facing DSC_0107 drag_fish daves_ta chp barry_ta 2challengers

xrr xracer xpurpleconv xpink xold xnewchallengers xhotrod xgreenbomb xemblem xbugjuice xbomb xbluebomb xblackcuda xamx xair

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The Dodge Kid in his youth about 1976. I think I wore this hat everyday through my Freshman year in high school. Photo by Nick Yee

The Dodge Kid in his youth about 1976.

 

Copyright © 2014 ChallenYee.com. TheDodgeKid.com  All Rights Reserved.